SQUAT | DRIVE

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Bodyweight squat jump

This is the first introduction into learning how to decelerate mass. With a bodyweight only option this allows us to see if there is sound control in the “landing” phase of the movement. It’s also a great drill to use with athletes needing to work on foot position with the Olympic lifts.

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Box jump

Varying heights allow us to choose the right fit for ourselves and our athletes. This combines the element of explosive power while working a deceleration phase as well with a bit of accuracy unlike the squat jump. Learning how to utilize your upper body is also a bonus when it comes to motor control and body awareness.

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Broad jump

The need for deceleration increases when we start to add height or in this case distance in our jump. It often also requires the need for proper foot position allowing athletes to land in a deep squat. Again, a great way to build explosive power and athleticism, especially in younger athletes that are not yet ready for the complexity of the barbell in Olympic lifts.

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Depth jump

Depending on the height and unloaded vs. loaded this is going to require the most from us when it comes to decelerating ourselves along with any external object. It can be an excellent way to help us identify if we or others are ready for more ballistic movements like the Olympic lifts and their variations.

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Drop lunge

This is a killer drill for those looking to work on speed and foot position that will apply to the split jerk. We introduce the need for deceleration and added demond for single leg stability here. Drilling both dominant and non dominant sides has added benefits on motor control development and athleticism.

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Jump switch lunge

Again, benefits from the drop and jumping lunge carry over. The split lunge now takes into account athleticism, balance, and motor control from both dominant and non dominant sides. These can be a great strength or conditioning tool depending on the goal you are looking to accomplish.

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Jumping front foot elevated split squat

Elevating the front foot simply increases our range of motion with the working leg. We can drive out of a true knee below the hip position which can correlate to our regular squat.

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Jumping lunge

The same benefits of our drop lunge carry over here but with the added requirement for explosive power. The increase in height on the jumping phase also adds in more demand for decelerating our mass.

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Jumping rear foot elevated split squat

Elevating the rear foot now places much more demand on the working leg for both deceleration along with stability and accuracy. These are a great tool for those playing field sports looking for serious single leg strength and stability when it comes to a foundation for lateral movements.

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Kneeling Jump

This ballistic jumping variation can be an excellent way to help athletes learn how to reach hip extension in a vertical manner. The need to drive up and land with feet in a proper squat position carries over nicely to all Olympic lift variations.

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Single leg box jump

Varying heights can make this more or less difficult. It can also show us limitations with motor control from one leg to another along with general coordination. Depending on the height there is an increase in speed that is required for this movement.

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Tuck jump

Often much more difficult than they appear, this squat variation shows the requirement for an increase in speed. Individuals need both the explosive power to meet a required height along with the speed to tuck the knees to the chest before landing. Also a great alternative to assist in building explosive power without the use of a barbell or weights. The athleticism can apply well toward field sports as well.

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Weighted Kneeling Jump

One of our personal favorites for those looking to change things up. Again, these achieve the same goal as our unloaded variation but they also create more demand for explosive power and speed. They are an excellent alternative for athletes looking to build these areas that may be dealing with an upper body injury or limitation.

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Weighted box jump

Adding loading to the box jump is recommended for only a select few. The need for explosive power, strength to decelerate, and accuracy with the added loading create a challenging movement. They can still create loads of explosive power without needing significant loading like some of our squat or Olympic lifting variations. Less taxing on the CNS and still extremely beneficial.

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Weighted seated box jump

The seated variation eliminates the ability to use the stretch reflex aspect of the movement. These can be done unloaded or loaded. Learning how to accelerate and produce power from a dead stop often leads to improved performance in those movements that provide a more dynamic start.

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Weighted squat jump

Simply increasing loading to our traditional squat jump can challenge even the most seasoned athletes. You can easily adjust the loading, adjust the demand and meet varying needs of a stimulus you are looking to create.

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