PULL

A solid entry into vertical pulling due to the ability to easily adjust loading or band tension. This can be an excellent accessory movement for the beginner and advanced athlete to help build lat strength.

Banded Lat Pull Down

A solid entry into vertical pulling due to the ability to easily adjust loading or band tension. This can be an excellent accessory movement for the beginner and advanced athlete to help build lat strength.

This is a challenging movement and often one that will be done with relatively light load. It is an excellent way to see if there is any imbalance from one side to the other, done in a unilateral fashion. It can also help with turn over in the snatch and it’s variations depending on the grip used.

Barbell or Dumbbell High Pull Hold

This is a challenging movement and often one that will be done with relatively light load. It is an excellent way to see if there is any imbalance from one side to the other, done in a unilateral fashion. It can also help with turn over in the snatch and it’s variations depending on the grip used.

One of our personal favorites for building upper body pulling power. Loading can vary meeting a variety of different stimulus goals. The added requirement of midline stability in an isometric fashion has value in it’s own right as well.

Bent over row

One of our personal favorites for building upper body pulling power. Loading can vary meeting a variety of different stimulus goals. The added requirement of midline stability in an isometric fashion has value in it’s own right as well.

The reality is that this is generally a “dead end” movement. It doesn’t apply to any of our other pulling movements but has a place in often competitive atmospheres. It requires shoulder flexibility, stability, and the capacity to significantly decelerate our mass in order for it to be safe and effective.

Butterfly pullups

The reality is that this is generally a “dead end” movement. It doesn’t apply to any of our other pulling movements but has a place in often competitive atmospheres. It requires shoulder flexibility, stability, and the capacity to significantly decelerate our mass in order for it to be safe and effective.

The fixed position of the torso accomplishes two things. One, we can’t cheat the movement by heaving the weight up. Two, it takes the need for midline stability out of the movement. Both have value in their own right and can be used for different purposes depending on the goal in mind.

Chest Supported Dumbbell Row

The fixed position of the torso accomplishes two things. One, we can’t cheat the movement by heaving the weight up. Two, it takes the need for midline stability out of the movement. Both have value in their own right and can be used for different purposes depending on the goal in mind.

One of our favorites for warming up the shoulders and lats when it comes to vertical pulling movements. It’s a test of grip strength, requires awareness with midline tension, and exposes shoulder flexibility and stability.

Hanging Hip Touch

One of our favorites for warming up the shoulders and lats when it comes to vertical pulling movements. It’s a test of grip strength, requires awareness with midline tension, and exposes shoulder flexibility and stability.

This can be a great tool to identify grip strength, shoulder stability, and even act as a stretch for the lats and shoulders when applicable.

Hold at bottom (dead hang)

This can be a great tool to identify grip strength, shoulder stability, and even act as a stretch for the lats and shoulders when applicable.

By varying the height of the barbell you can increase the demand on grip and back strength. This is generally a good tool for deconditioned, elderly, or athletes recovering from an injury.

Hold in inverted barbell row with arms extended

By varying the height of the barbell you can increase the demand on grip and back strength. This is generally a good tool for deconditioned, elderly, or athletes recovering from an injury.

Although simple, depending on the height of the bar this is a great way to build upper back, lat, and bicep strength. For many, it will be the foundation of a chest to bar pull up.

Hold in inverted barbell row with bar at chest

Although simple, depending on the height of the bar this is a great way to build upper back, lat, and bicep strength. For many, it will be the foundation of a chest to bar pull up.

Rings add a slight element of instability but generally is not noticeable when hanging from them. Advantages are the ability to rotate the rings to accommodate potential shoulder issues.

Hold in ring row with arms extended

Rings add a slight element of instability but generally is not noticeable when hanging from them. Advantages are the ability to rotate the rings to accommodate potential shoulder issues.

Similar to the barbell variation this is a challenging position for some. Rotation of the rings accommodates shoulder issues and you can even work to increase range of motion by bridging your chest through the rings.

Hold in ring row with rings at chest

Similar to the barbell variation this is a challenging position for some. Rotation of the rings accommodates shoulder issues and you can even work to increase range of motion by bridging your chest through the rings.

Come on, you all remember the flex arm hang from the presidential test in elementary school. Upper back, lat, and bicep strength all play a role here. This can be a great tool for those looking to get their first strict pull up.

Hold with chin over bar

Come on, you all remember the flex arm hang from the presidential test in elementary school. Upper back, lat, and bicep strength all play a role here. This can be a great tool for those looking to get their first strict pull up.

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