HINGE | NEUTRAL

Neutral

Deadlift from blocks

Pulling from the blocks provides us with simply limiting our range of motion to an appropriate place for an individual. Loading can still be introduced while not risking poor mechanics with increased range of motion. For some, they can also be a great way to train through weak spots in the pull on their deadlift.

Neutral

Deficit deadlift

Believe it or not some may PREFER pulling from a deficit. While limiting loading due to a larger range of motion this can help some athletes feel more “engaged”. This is typically the case for those that have a tendency to over extend in their low back when setting up for pulling off the floor.

Neutral

Good morning

Light loading with this can be an excellent way to teach hinge mechanics that apply to any deadlift, kettlebell swing, and a variety of the Olympic lifts or their variations. With additional weight these can be incredibly challenging on the midline due to the large lever arm created by bar position. Increasing strength here can lead to breakthroughs in other lifts like your squat and deadlift.

Neutral

Romanian deadlift

Starting from the top of the movement can be an excellent teaching tool for truly setting ourselves up for success when it comes to lowering weight. The mechanics are the same as the good morning but with the weight in our hands and shorter lever arm created with the barbell placement it allows for significantly more loading.

Neutral

Single leg deadlift

In a TRUE deadlift pattern this is the most challenging of the single leg hinge pattern movements. Maximizing the demand for hip/knee stability, and glute strength. This will also quickly expose the potential imbalances in the legs and potentially even the low back.

Neutral

Single leg kb/db/bb/landmine rdl

Depending on the object and which hand is holding the weight you can work varying degrees of difficulty with the single leg variation of the RDL. This single leg movement offers a lower barrier to entry than some of the other movements you would see like a reverse foot elevated lunge.

Neutral

Snatch grip deadlift

Of course we know that this will increase strength and confidence in the snatch. Particularly the pull off the floor where most of the deviations can occur. Upper back engagement is key here and the added challenge which with naturally limit the loading compared to other deadlift variations.

Neutral

Split Stance Good Morning

This is an excellent tool to get the hamstrings and glutes engaged when working to stabilize the hip. Adding the loading to the back in a good morning position increases the lever arm making the movement more challenging than the RDL variations.

Neutral

Sumo deadlift

For many the more upright torso allows for more substantial loads to be lifted off the floor. There is also a shorter range of motion the bar is required to travel which can help with increased weight compared to our traditional deadlift. Again, this is often preference from athlete to athlete.

Neutral

Traditional deadlift

The true hinge pattern pull off the floor. This is the fundamental pulling movement that everyone needs to develop for any barbell movement coming off the floor. For some this will feel stronger than a sumo deadlift but it ultimately depends on body mechanics and where you feel strongest.

Neutral

Trap Bar Deadlift

This variation allows the least lever arm produced in relationship with our midline. The trap bar allows us to center the loading with ourselves providing a true vertical pull with no concern of bar path around the knees. Depending on the bar you may also see a more upright torso present. This can be a great tool for those getting back to deadlift after any back issues.

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